Thirdeyemom

A Visit with Haitian Bone and Horn Artist Christelle Paul

“Sonje lapli ki leve mayo ou” – Remember the rain that made your corn grow (Haitian proverb)

I had never heard of Horn and Bone art until I first visited Haiti two years ago and met with Haitian Horn and Bone artist Christelle Paul, founder and chief designer of her workshop Atelier Calla“ in Port-au-Prince. Horn and Bone art began within the walls of Haiti’s prisons in the 1950s. To pass the time, the men in prison enjoyed playing games and they ingeniously discovered they could use old horns and bones to make pieces for card games. The art continued to evolve over the years being passed down from generation to generation.

Christelle has always been passionate about art yet she pursed a career in business and worked in the banking industry for many years. One day back in 2006 she was out shopping and noticed that there were a lot of products made out of horn and bone yet none that she really liked. This inspired her to start creating her own horn and bone jewelry based on the designs and ideas she desired. What began as a hobby suddenly grew into a passion. Yet the journey from being a full-time banker to full-time artist was a long one.

A series of setbacks such as the devastating 2010 earthquake stopped Christelle from following her dreams. A inspiring meeting with world renown designer Donna Karan was the final push Christelle needed to leave banking and pursue her passion for Bone and Horn art full-time. Her workshop Atelier Calla“ was opened in October of 2011 and today her team employs a handful of artisans within the community who were once unemployed. Her mission is to provide fair wages and work opportunities to help young, unemployed people find a fulfilling, sustainable career in the arts. She is a remarkable woman.

The last time I was in Haiti in 2015, I had visited Christelle’s studio to learn more about this unique kind of art and also hear how her studio and workshop have helped other Haitians pursue a career in Horn and Bone art. Since my past visit two years ago, Christelle has moved to a new location in the center of Port-au-Prince in her mother’s home that was abandoned after the 2010 earthquake. Christelle is in the process of rebuilding the house as her studio and workshop. The roof fell down and walls have crumbled leaving a big part of the house in ruins. However, Christelle is determined to rebuild and get her new studio and workshop all fixed up. She has done it before seven years ago after the earthquake struck and she lost everything. She had to start all over again, working seven days a week while raising three young children yet succeeded. She attributes her strong resilience to simply being Haitian. The path is never easy but with hard work, perseverance and resilience I am certain Christelle will succeed.

Driving from our hotel to Christelle’s studio. Conditions in Port-au-Prince are still very difficult and the infrastructure throughout the country significantly needs to be improved. This is a challenge for entrepreneurs as it makes getting their products to the market difficult. 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

It was an extremely hot afternoon when we arrived at Christelle’s workshop. The smell of smoke filled the air as the horns were being prepared over a small fire. It is fascinating to see the horns turn colors as they burn. There is actually a significant amount of variety in the colors which you will instantly notice when you see the final product.

Atelier Calla, Port-au-Prince, Haiti

 Atelier Calla, Port-au-Prince, HaitiIn Haiti, many times art is made from recycled or discarded materials and Horn and Bone art is the perfect example. Artisans purchase the horn and bone from slaughterhouses once all of the meat is taken and skin sent away to leather manufacturers. They use almost the entire cow to create incredibly, beautiful art. It is astounding!

Christelle Paul Horn and Bone Art Haiti

The raw materials are horns and bones from cows.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Atelier Calla, Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Christelle shows us the different colors of raw material

Once the bones and horns have their beautiful color, the next step is to polish the material to give it a lustrous, shiny sheen.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The final products are spectacular. Here are a few of my favorites:

Atelier Calla, Port-au-Prince, HaitiAtelier Calla, Port-au-Prince, HaitiAtelier Calla, Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Her mother’s home was almost completely destroyed after the earthquake but it is not stopping Christelle from setting up her new workshop.

As we left the studio, Christelle pointed out the remaining rubble and work that still needs to be done. Her next goal is to put a tin roof over the workshop and also eventually expand her tiny office into more space. It will be exciting to see what Christelle does next.

As we left the studio, Christelle pointed out the remaining rubble and work that still needs to be done. Her next goal is to put a tin roof over the workshop and also eventually expand her tiny office into more space. It will be exciting to see what Christelle does next.As we left the studio, Christelle pointed out the remaining rubble and work that still needs to be done. Her next goal is to put a tin roof over the workshop and also eventually expand her tiny office into more space. It will be exciting to see what Christelle does next.SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

12 comments

    • Thanks Lulu! It truly is a big part of a country and in Haiti art is huge. It was really cool learning about all the different kinds of art there. I loved it.

    • Thanks! Yes it is amazing the beautiful art that can be made from items that are usually tossed away. It was incredible to see it all! Thanks for stopping by and commenting!

  1. Fascinating Nicole. I had no idea this kind of work existed. I love art made from “nothing”, or recycled stuff. She seems like one very strong woman.
    Alison

    • Thanks Alison! Yes it is really amazing and yes Christelle is such an inspiration. She could have stayed in banking yet instead felt a desire and passion to help people and work with art. She is truly amazing.

  2. Interesting story, how sometimes there’s distinct catalyst, and other times it’s a slow and subtle journey… I like that she is reclaiming the family property and slowly giving it new life – and hope.

    • Thanks Lisa and yes I love her story. I love too how she had to begin and begin again but still keeps on plugging away and working so hard despite the setbacks. Her art is so cool too. I had never heard of horn and bone art until I met Christelle.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: