Thirdeyemom

The Art and Color of Carnival

“Piti piti, zwazo fè nich” – “Little by little birds build their nests” – Haitian proverb

Similar to the rest of Latin America, Haiti was colonized by Europeans who imposed their Roman Catholic religion on the people. While half of the island was colonized by the Spanish and became the Dominican Republic, the western, smaller portion of the island was colonized by the French and is officially known as the Republic of Haiti.

Haiti is the only predominantly Francophone nation in the Americas and also one of the only nations to practice Voodoo, a syncretic religion that blends African, European and indigenous Taíno beliefs. Haitian Voodoo originated in the Caribbean during the 18th century French Empire as a way for West African slaves to continue using their own religion and beliefs while they were being forced to convert to Christianity. About half of all Haitians practice a combination of Catholicism and Voodoo.

It just so happened that I was in Haiti during Carnival. In all my travels, I had never experienced Carnival before and given Haiti’s unique combination of Catholicism and Voodoo, I could only imagine what Carnival would be like. I had already seen a lot of religious influences within Haiti’s amazing art, music and dance during the first few days of my visit. I knew attending Carnival in Port-au-Prince would be one of those bucket-list life experiences.

As a stoke of luck, our Haitian friend Nat who is the Executive Director of ABN (Artisan Business Network) was able to get our group tickets to be in the Minister of Tourism’s stand. We would leave at six o’clock to beat the masses of crowds that would eventually make the Champs de Mars impassable until the wee hours of the morning.

As we left Pétionville and headed down the mountain into the heart of Port-au-Prince, traffic was intense and preparations for Carnival were well underway. Earlier in the day, we had stopped by one of the stands on Champs de Mars to visit one of the artisans that Nat works with at ABN. The finishing touches were going up all around us.

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

Going down the heart of Champs de Mars, where the streets are lined with stands for Carnival.

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

The bright stalls are going up all around.

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

Last minute preparations are underway.

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

It takes months to prepare for Carnival each year. Papier-mâché decorations are made, stands and floats are built, and costumes are designed unique to each and every Carnival. The actual festival takes place over the course of several days and involves a parade, street parties, live music and dancing, and of course all the glorious costumes and carnival masks. It is one of the few times during the year that Haitians take a break from work and protesting that wrecks frequent havoc on the city. Our trip was actually almost canceled due to dangerous fuel protests occurring right around the time of our arrival but with the approach of Carnival, everything stopped for a few days while Haitians relaxed and embraced this special time of year.

As we were driving back from Jacmel on Sunday into Port-au-Prince, we pulled over to visit Pascale Faublas, a world renowned papier-mâché artist from Jacmel, and see her work. She was designing her own stand and as a long-time Heart of Haiti supporter and supplier, we were thrilled to meet her.

 Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

Danica Kombol, founder of Everywhere and leader for our Haiti trip with Haitian artist Pascale Faublas.

Pascale’s magnificent creation was still in the works.

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

First sight of Pascale’s stand

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

Papier-mâché has a long history in Haiti, originating from the French and becoming one of Carnival’s most important forms of artwork. Many of the exotic masks of animals and deities are made from papier-mâché, however, this form of art is also seen in vases, serving trays and platters and other collectors items many that are offered at Macy’s through their Heart of Haiti line to benefit Haitian artisans.

Most Haitian Papier-mâché artisans paint their pieces in the brilliant colors that bring the world to life. Everything was so intensely colorful it made me smile.

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

            Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

Pascale was raised in Port-au-Prince and has been creating beautiful art her entire life.  In 2004, she moved to a seaside village on the outskirts on Jacmel with her daughter and joined a community of papier-mâché artists. She works in papier-mâché as well as wood, textiles and mixed media. Pascale is a leader of the collective organization that is creating Macy’s products and has had a pivotal role in the creation of ABN (the Artisan Business Network). Pascale’s home and workshop were destroyed in the earthquake yet her work continues to inspire and amaze the world and other artisans around Haiti.

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

The colors splashed around the stand were equally as brilliant as the papier-mâché. The finishing touches were being done and by the evening, all would be ready in Pascale and her neighbor’s stand.

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-PrinceCarnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

Of course we couldn’t resist taking some photos of ourselves against the gorgeous background.

While we were observing the preparations for Carnival, we noticed a swarm of street vendors below who were selling various handicrafts and pieces of art. Once they saw us and realized we were potential buyers, they came in masses.

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

Street vendors trying to catch our attention.

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

Before we knew it, there were many of them.

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

If we saw a painting we liked, they would pass it up and if we liked it, we would pass our dollars down the same way.

And they made some great sales to our group! Almost everyone purchased a lovely work of Haitian art.

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

Stacey Ferguson of “Justice Fergie” and creator of Blogalicious (Blogging conference) holding up her new painting.

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

Kayla Wright of Everywhere holding up her new possession.

I even bought a painting as well but I passed on the feathers.

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-PrinceThere were also lots of leather goods, vases and Carnival masks for sale. You could have gone crazy with all the shopping in the streets.

Carnaval 2015 Port-au-Prince

As we left Champ de Mars and headed back to our hotel to rest, I couldn’t contain my excitement for the night. I could hardly wait to see the city alive and dancing to the glorious sounds of Carnival. I knew it was going to be a night I’d never forget.

 

 

 

 

14 comments

    • I loved your post Debra! It is amazing too how different the Carnivals are in Haiti and Italy. The floats in Viareggio were pretty amazing. I loved all the political ones too.

    • Nat, I loved the trip, loved Haiti and meeting you was wonderful. I really truly hope I can help you and Haiti. I also would love to come back again on the next trip. It is a special place and you are a very special person! 🙂 Take care!!!

    • Thanks Janet! Yes I will admit I was very surprised by the amazing art and color everywhere in Haiti. All over the street was art and color even within the rubble. It really is a fascinating place.

  1. Nicole, I didn’t see a photo of the painting you bought. You’ll have to write a post about the unusual things you buy from around the world. I’d love to see your collection. I usually read blog posts early in the morning and these colorful photos made my eyes pop. I am in love with the papier-mâché masks.

    • I actually bought the same painting as my friend Stacey, of the Haitian women. I love it!

      I really enjoyed the trip. Now I’m stuck in jury duty for next two weeks so my writing may be slow depending on the amount of free time I get. What a contrast being here in the juror waiting room basement than in Haiti one week ago!I much preferred Haiti! 🙂

  2. It is impossible to experience Carnivale and not get caught up in the excitement! We were lucky to be a part of it while traveling in Mexico. Can’t wait for the next post! 🙂

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