Thirdeyemom

The tilted view of the streets of Delhi

“It is impossible not to be astonished by India. Nowhere on Earth does humanity present itself in such a dizzying, creative burst of cultures and religions, races and tongues”. -A Rough Guide to India

A trip through the streets of India brings humanity to her knees. No place on earth is quite like India. When asked by friends “What is India like” I seem to suddenly become silent as no words can fully describe the place unless you’ve been there.  Through all her culture, her craziness, her unbelievable sights and her charm, India remains perhaps one of the most intriguing places in the world. I don’t think any place on earth can quite compare.

Getting around India is one of the most knuckle clenching, heart racing things you can do. Oftentimes there are cows in the streets, traffic coming at you in every direction and people everywhere. Many times you get awfully close to an overpacked car and the two dozen pairs of eyes seem to stare into your soul.

Inspired by the views seen through the streets of Delhi I compiled a post of my favorite street shots, many taken from inside a moving vehicle as I was tilting or craning my neck. Just taking a ride through the streets of Delhi is bound to capture your attention and your camera. I remembered to take my third eye along on this trip and it is a good thing I did. Everything and anything is possible in India.

Here are some of my favorite captures.

Delhi Street Photography

View outside the car at the over-crowded streets of Delhi.

Driving through the city is a heart palpitating activity. In India, you always hire a driver as there is no way any foreigner with any kind of sanity would attempt to fight the Indian roads on their own.

Delhi Street Photography

Delhi Street Photography

What always shocks me about India is the difference between new and old, rich and poor, and modernity and antiquity. There are many areas in Delhi which have no paved streets, only dirt outlines of a road. No matter though. Traffic still whizzes and whirls by like a tornado.

Delhi Street Photography

Markets like this one are plentiful.

Delhi Street Photography

Stores sell everything from live chickens to fans and AC units.

Delhi Street Photography

There are even fresh juice carts to quench your thirst which is necessary when it is 120 degrees!

Delhi Street Photography

Delhi Street Photography

Many times the pavement ends.

Delhi Street Photography

Chicken anyone?

Delhi Street Photography

Delhi Street Photography

Delhi Street Photography

Delhi Street Photography

Delhi Street Photography

Delhi Street Photography

Delhi Street Photography

Delhi Street Photography

Delhi Street Photography

Tuk Tuks are plentiful and easy to get around town. Yet your life can be at risk.

Delhi Street Photography

Delhi Street Photography

Delhi Street Photography

Delhi Street Photography

Delhi Street Photography

Delhi Street Photography

Making naan bread.

Delhi Street Photography

Even barbers in the street.

Delhi Street Photography

Delhi Street Photography

Delhi Street Photography

Delhi Street Photography

Delhi Street Photography

And of course with all the rich comes the absolute poor. The slums which weave in and out Delhi.

This post was inspired by Where’s my Backpack’s travel theme: Tilted. To see more entries, click here

Related posts:

Riding a rickshaw through the streets of Old Delhi

The colorful curves of Jama Masjid

49 comments

  1. for European eyes this chaos, anarchy, is sometimes shocking, but – on the other hand – makes me smile very often, because I discover a wonderful human individual cleverness to overcome the bad and difficult conditions. It seems, the politicians are not doing their duty – but the people often found a way to success (and often not: especially women!)

  2. Fabulous collection of pics, Nicole. They really do tell a story of what life is really like for the common man in India. I was intrigued by the sign above the ‘Banquet Hall’, so I had to looked up what a kitty party was. 🙂

  3. Everyone that I know who has visited India comes away with a heavy heart. Your images express that feeling as well as life’s small moments. The reality of these pictures give a partial view of lives very, very different from ours. These images are Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs at work.

    • Oh thank you. That is why I had to include them. India is one of the most fascinating places I’ve ever been yet you are indeed right, it is hard on the soul. When you come back, you feel so much guilt over everything we have and everything people there don’t. Part of my trip to India and Nepal in 2010 is what lead me to start my blog and enter this new path of advocacy and giving back. I was forever changed.

  4. I agree with lensandpensbysally. This makes my heart so heavy. There must be so much government corruption when the economy is full of growth. Every person I’ve met from India here is the U.S. is always kind, with good manners. Plus very intelligent. These people deserve so much more. Thank you for giving us a dose of reality. My heart goes out to them.

    • Yes so true. There is so much inequity in India. I’ve been to China as well with even a larger population but it is so different. I hope things change for the people of India.

    • Thanks. Yes I can imagine. I’m really glad I got to visit india and also do some social good reporting in the slums. I probably saw a lot that most people don’t.

  5. Your photos will soon acquire Steve McCurry status, Nicole. You tell the story of humanity with them so brilliantly.
    Much of it looks like my worst nightmare, if I’m honest.

  6. Excellent depictions of daily life, Nicole. Again, I’m peeking at their laundry hanging out to dry. I was wondering about the street vendors selling juice. Did you try any? I’d be very afraid of getting Hep A. I just discovered that there is a vaccine for Hep A. We’ve had the Hep B vaccinations, but we really need to get the A because I’ve seen some street vendors cutting fruit then cleaning under their fingernails with their knives. YUCK!

    • Thanks! No I never eat anything even juice off the street. I’ve had way too many parasites and stomach issues when traveling so I am very careful. Last time in India, my dad and I got VERY sick. My dad had to go to the ER a day after returning to the states with a temp of 105 and stomach issues for a month. I was really careful this time and ate wonderful, delicious food and didn’t get sick.

  7. Reblogged this on Flickr Comments and commented:
    for European eyes this chaos, anarchy, is sometimes shocking, but – on the other hand – makes me smile very often, because I discover a wonderful human individual cleverness to overcome the bad and difficult conditions.

  8. Saw this from Frizz’s re-blog. Thank you for the vivid, heartfelt tour of Indian streets. Probably safer viewed from my computer chair, but envy the savour, and noise, and chaos of being there. Wonderful.

    • Thanks! I actually got the name from traveling to India and Nepal where the third eye gives you a bigger perspective on things but now it is becoming more of my camera too!

  9. I love your post, it takes me right back to one of the most amazing places I’ve been, with unbelievable sights around every corner. The only thing not to love about India is the inequality.

    • Thanks. I liked your rant too. It is so true that people get so bent out of shape about such little things when people are dying around the world as I type.

    • Me too! I really loved that trip Jennifer. It was incredible and I hope to put my best foot forward for the next 20-30 years promoting social good around the world. 🙂

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