Thirdeyemom

The Colorful Curves of Jama Masjid

Within the chaotic narrow streets of Old Delhi lies the largest mosque in India, the Jama Masjid, whose enormous courtyard has the capacity to hold 25,000 devotees.  Built between 1644 and 1658, this sensational mosque was the last extravagnance commissioned by Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan, whose love for his wife resulted in the world-famous Taj Mahal in Agra and zest for beauty and power built the Red Fort of New Delhi.

The Jama Masjid’s spectacular beauty resides in her masterful architecture of various curving archways, gates, minarets, towers and decorative carvings. Jama Masjid’s brilliant red-hued sandstone juxtaposed against white marble is equally as impressive especially on a sunny, bright day. It took over 6,000 workers, mostly slaves, to build the mosque and today it remains one of India’s crown jewels and an important place of worship.

Jama Masjid

Jama Masjid

Jama Masjid

The entrance is rather daunting as it is so vast inside, and it was so hot. It was 120 degrees farenheit that day and the rules of entering a mosque still applied. No shoes and we had to cover up in a rented robe.

Jama Masjid Robes

Jama Masjid

Jennifer James and our guide walking towards the mosque on a rug to protect our feet from the burning red sandstone.

Jama Masjid

The mosque boasts four towers and two minarets reaching toward the sky.

Jama MasjidAs we approached the mosque and stepped inside, a sense of peace was overpowering as was a deep understanding of beauty.

Jama Masjid

Inside the Jama Masjid

Inside the Jama Masjid

Beautifully covered Qurʼans were available for those who wanted to pray.

Inside the Jama Masjid Inside the Jama Masjid Inside the Jama MasjidThe detail on the walls and ceilings was breathtaking.

Inside the Jama Masjid

The sacred lotus flower could be found engraved throughout the mosque.

Inside the Jama MasjidInside the Jama MasjidInside the Jama MasjidInside the Jama Masjid

Jama Masjid

Jama Masjid

Jama Masjid

The Kings Door.

Jama Masjid

Water spouts available for purification.

Jama MasjidJama Masjid Jama Masjid And as you left the peace and tranquility of the mosque, the hum and buzz of Old Delhi brought you back to earth. Old DelhiThis post was written for this week’s Photo Challenge: Curves. I was in Delhi at the end of May for a social good blogging trip with Mom Bloggers for Social Good. To learn more about our trip, see hashtag #socialgoodmomsindia on Twitter or check out my earlier posts. 

31 comments

  1. Pingback: Weekly Photo Challenge - Curves

  2. Sas

    I can’t imagine a mosque so big that it holds so many people! There are a lot of mosques where I used to live in Rhodes (left behind after the Turkish occupation) and also here in Cardiff, and they are very beautiful buildings.

  3. Wonderful photos, Nicole. What a contrast between the peace inside, and the hustle and bustle outside. Your final pic is so interesting to just sit and gaze at. 🙂

  4. Pingback: The tilted view of the streets of Delhi | Thirdeyemom

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